“Where all that traffic does come from Daddyyyy?”- Bumpers Like Rain!

I’m not speaking about the typical connotative bumpers we “jam on” for Carnival. We’re talking bumper to fender traffic piled up on our Nation’s highways, main roads, back roads, nooks and crannies; your granddaddies took to check your grannies. STANDSTILL TRAFFIC, everywhere.

Photo: Wa Chubble is Dis
Photo: Wa Chubble is Dis

It’s Monday 23rd March, 2015… and this is what our roadways look like

Photo courtesy Marlon Arman-Marquis
Photo courtesy Marlon Arman-Marquis
Photo: CNC3

This “unplanned roadblock” began from as early as 5am exactly one week ago Monday morning, I remember waking up to finding out about endless traffic, statuses going on up Facebook one after the next about “Police checking everything” and “Traffic like mad” I had absolutely no intentions of leaving my house to be held up in traffic for menacing hours.

Children were unable to get to school, employers and employees alike were all unable to reach the workplaces, flights were cancelled, banks were unable to open, the PBR was at a standstill, the EMR jammed and let’s not speak about the Highways. .

The greatest however, were the images that were flooding social networks. Photos taken by the frustrated drivers held up in traffic of Police officers efficiently and meticulously doing their work by checking oil, spare tires etc. because we all know that in T&T the officers of TTPS are the most multi-talented and diverse. However, don’t mind my sarcasm. This was true; the image below is of a news report from CNC3

Photocred: CNC3 via "Wa Chubble is Dis?"

Photo: Wa Chubble is Dis
Photo: Wa Chubble is Dis

See didn’t I tell you they were checking every single thing?!

Let’s stray from this disaster that took place and focus on what the theme of this blog is about…. Stereotypes; this blog entry will delve into “Stereotypes attached to TTPS”

Photo: Wa Chubble is DIs
Photo: Wa Chubble is DIs

By no means are these MY PERSONAL VIEWS, the following are stereotypes I’ve heard over the past few years and the number of them that came up on my news feed during Monday’s roadblocks.

  • Police doesn’t do anything and get paid
  • Police corrupt
  • Police like too much woman
  • Police does take bribe
  • Police wotless
  • Police does wine on people for Carnival
  • Police disrespectful
  • Police like to abuse their power
  • Police slow and unresponsive to crime
  • Police afraid to go in bad man area
  • The worst man you could be with is a Police man
  • Police men are people who failed high school and getting paid more than people with degrees
  • Police were people who used to get bullied when they were younger so now they take advantage of other people

I can bet my last dollar, that you’ve at least heard 3 of these stereotypes; if not then you’re clearly not from Trinidad & Tobago or you’re a Police (no offense). However, are there truths to any of these stereotypes? Comment and let me know.

Now being as objective as I can be with the issue on Monday, the Police are in fact right for protesting for their raise of pay since they have one of the lowest paid jobs in public service as well as having the highest risk. According to the Secretary of the Police and Social Welfare Association, Michael Seales said that members have been complaining that since 2011 there has been no progress in the negotiations with the Chief Personnel Officer (CPO). Seales said the basic salary of a junior police officer was TT$5,123 (One TT dollar =US$0.16 cents) and just about TT$1,000 more in benefits. However, the manner in which they protested by holding our island under ransom caused massive losses to productivity and finances, which set the state back millions of dollars just for that one day. So yes, the police were wrong in the way they protested but they aren’t wrong for wanting a raise in pay.

If you’re a UWI student like me you would remember the strike of the OWTU, the janitors did not clean bathrooms or empty garbage for more than 2 weeks. The stench was unbearable and there was litter everywhere, garbage cans were overflowing and flies and bees were beginning to circulate.

Everyone protests in some way or the other to get what they want, this has become a norm in T&T so don’t be mad at the Police for protesting, be mad at them for holding the state as ransom. Also, don’t lose faith in them they were doing their job after all and very efficiently might I add. At the end of the day the Police are the first people we contact during emergencies and mishaps (excluding the Ambulance) so let’s work together with them instead of criticizing, give constructive criticism, they are not all bad, there are good ones out there.

Let’s just say thank God that T&TEC didn’t decide to strike

😀 :v (y)


Read more: http://www.caribbean360.com/news/trinidad-comes-to-a-virtual-standstill-as-police-deny-embarking-upon-industrial-action#ixzz3VqnONyT7

Wa Chubble is Dis via Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Wachubbleisdis?ref=ts&fref=ts

CNC3 via Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/CNC3Television?ref=ts&fref=ts

Guardian: VIDEO: Gridlock across T&T roadways as police conduct stop and search exercises during rush hour traffic. Video: Jeff Mayers / T&T Guardian


De Only Good Red Thing is a Dollar

A calm Sunday evening while taking a drive with some friends around the savannah, we saw this gorgeous red-skinned girl. Her skin flawless, legs for days as she was showing them off in short shorts, curly hair, and brown eyes. Plaint talk… She was a looker (coming from a heterosexual female) even I did a double take, along with my two male and two female friends. Comments were “Damnnn that body”, “Omg, I love her hair”, “Woman to have”… and then out of the blue, “Too bad de only good red thing issa dollar!” that last comment had everyone else saying “For real” and in agreement. However, I’ve heard this all my life and its a social belief that majority of Trinibagonians use. Let’s be real if you’re a Trini there’s no doubt in my mind that you’ve heard that phrase.


“De only good red thing is a dollar?” but why? My friends didn’t know the girl personally so why jump to that conclusion? This is where my curiosity to understand such a stereotype came from.

What does this statement even mean?

In the simplest way to put it, “De only good red thing is a dollar” with reference to a female who has lighter skin or as we know it “red skin” (usually mixed women), means that when it comes to red “things” the dollar beats back the woman, as the woman isn’t good, then she obviously has to be bad, right? Not really, this statement also attaches a connotation behind it that implies that “all red woman bad”. Don’t front here people we know what bad in Trini slang means.


Patriarchal Society

As much as we have feminists in an abundance these days, we can’t forget that we live in a patriarchal society where in the colonial era women were objectified and seen as objects to use, this is where we get the reference of encapsulating a women when speaking of “red things”

Unfair Stereotype

Being as objective as I can be and also doing research, surveys and ethnographic studies, I came to the conclusion that this stereotype is completely unfair to say the least. Majority of these women are usually perceived in a negative light because of this local stereotype that has existed since I could remember myself.

Why do people think red women are “bad”?

So I did some investigation into why people assume this. My method was to post a status on Facebook and allow the comments and opinions to pour in, the following images are screenshots of what was said.

The status I posted
The status I posted


IMG_20150322_180859 IMG_20150322_180953

From the screenshots you can see that although there is some division among the comments, the majority of people agree that “the only good red thing is indeed a dollar”

The following are screenshots from a heated conversation about “red women” on Twitter:

IMG_20150322_184628 IMG_20150322_184650 IMG_20150322_184741 IMG_20150322_184930

Now these screenshots are extreme opinions of red women

People have usually said:

  • Red women have a bad attitude
  • Red women feel they better than everyone else
  • Red women like to “horn”
  • Red women too stush
  • Red women like material things
  • Red women can’t cook
  • Red women too high maintenance
  • Red women only good for looks and nothing else

The list goes on and on and on and on

Good “red women”

I can’t agree with the popular consensus because I have red skinned friends who are nothing like what these stereotypes state. My friends are all humble, friendly, faithful , down to earth, independent and ambitious. These young women have more to offer than just their great looks and complexion. They’re all furthering their studies and have never been in any compromising situation where they characters were questionable. However, they have all been victims of these stereotypical comments and even thought they’ve complained, they moved passed them because their goals are bigger than stereotypes that aren’t true, especially those that are attached to them because of their complexion.

Adriana Salandy Student at UWI BA in Psychology
Faith Espinoza Administrative Secretary, Student: Associates in Tourism Management
Elizabeth Cox Corporate Secretary Student: Business Management

So to conclude this blog, the only good red thing IS INDEED a dollar, because women aren’t things… We’re human beings.

“I Live Where You Vacation”- Trinibagonian Stereotypes

“I live where you vacation”

"I Live Where You Vacation"
“I Live Where You Vacation”

Trinidad and Tobago’s scenic landscapes attract many tourist and quite often people are “surprised” when they observe that we actually have an economic industry beside tourism. Absurd right? I recently had an encounter with a relative from abroad who’s never been to T&T but has heard of it. The questions she asked me about where I live had me picking up my jaw from the floor. First the way she spoke as if I was deaf had me telling her, “I’m Trini… Not deaf.” made me think about how many other people think these very obnoxious stereotypes about our twin-islands. Here’s a list of general stereotypes I’ve come across, ranging from some drastic ones to some that have truth in them.

Anyone with a Caribbean accent is automatically from Jamaica

Sesame Street's Representation of the Caribbean
Sesame Street used Jamaica to represent the entire Caribbean

I have some friends studying abroad who frequently complain about foreigners asking them if they’re from Jamaica as soon as they hear their accents. Newsflash, not everyone with a Caribbean accent is from Jamaica. Jamaica isn’t the only island that exists in the Caribbean, get an atlas, this is the 21st Century. Seriously? Many times we can see Jamaica being used as a representation for the Caribbean as a whole, so the media is partly to blame for some of the stereotypes. Some may even blame Trinibagonians for not promoting their culture as much as Jamaicans do. However, the point is there are many other Caribbean accents and not all of them sound like Jamaicans and come from Jamaica. They’re the Bajans, the Vincentians, the St. Lucians and so forth.

Everyone in Trinidad lives next to a beach

Home to some of the most beautiful beaches
Home to some of the most beautiful beaches

Beside the fact that this question is so stereotypical, how is this logically possible that 1.2 million individuals has the beach as their backyards? What happens to all the other land away from the coastlines? Are they “undiscovered” still? This is such an annoying stereotype that upsets me because it makes me think that people believe all we do in Trinidad is live this hyper-fantasized idea of living on the beach and relaxing ALL THE TIME.

economy  Silhouette of oil platform in sea against moody sky at sunset

Let me eliminate that idea one time, we do not ONLY have beaches here in fact we have a series of successful business and we can boast of islands rich with natural resources. People hustle and bustle daily to their jobs which isn’t just being a coconut or doubles vendor, which brings me to my next point…

Coconut Vendors, Doubles Vendors, Vegetable Vendors and Women Making Ornaments at the road side.


This is such a pervasive stereotype that Trinbagonians and by extension Caribbean people face, that we do not have other jobs beside selling something made by hand or selling fruits and vegetable and honey at the side of the road. The movies really has a primitive way of portraying “island life” as extremely laid back and not taking things seriously, when in fact we do more than pick coconuts and sell.

All Trinis do is LIME!!!


There is definitely some truth in this stereotype and if you say no, “Yuh blasted lying”. We see you on the Avenue liming and drinking, taking a wine on the ‘smallie’ that pass in the short shorts, you and your girls tracking that fineee man passing by and if you’re still in denial Triniscene and Lime.TT can prove you wrong.

Admit it, Carnival is the most anticipated time of the year for Trinbagonians whether you play mas or you’re anti-Carnival you still look forward to the season. Some may go to every single fete and participate in almost all/ all Carnival related activities. Whereas, those who participate may go to the beach or camp etc. Whatever you do you see it as a lime and Carnival happens to be a great reason to lime.

The Greatest Show on Earth

Let’s be real here whether you and your friends are catching up on some hot gossip over dinner or partying it out on the Avenue you’re still liming. Trinibagonians make a lime out of anything and find any reason to lime. Can’t necessarily blame us when we live where you vacation 🙂